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2022-2023 Investment Portfolio

2022-2023 United Way of Southern Maine
INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO

Download Investment Portfolio.

You Keep Up Hopeful for Southern Maine

It can be hard to feel hopeful right now. The pandemic lingers on, the cost of living continues to rise, and too many are struggling with their mental health. These challenges are complex, vast, and interconnected. We cannot ensure all kids have a strong start until families have access to child care and housing. We cannot help people address mental health issues without ensuring access to healthcare.

But what keeps us hopeful are the caring people who took action to help improve lives and build a thriving community.

Thanks to our community, over the past year, UWSM raised money and invested it in partners found in this portfolio who share a desire for collaboration around a shared community vision, Thrive2027; a focus on racial equity; and a commitment to strong outcomes for programs serving people. But there’s more! United Way connects people and organizations to volunteer opportunities. United Way’s 211 Maine connects people who need help with local resources. United Way advocates for policies to help bridge the gaps in education, financial stability, and health. UWSM functions as the convening organization and provides administrative support for the Emergency Food and Shelter Program, which brings millions of dollars into our community. United Way also provides leadership of innovative, collaborative initiatives.

The bottom line: UWSM magnifies our collective resources and catalyzes change on issues too big for one organization alone to address. The result? Together, we are building a community where every child has quality early learning experiences, adults are empowered to pursue careers with family-sustaining wages, and individuals have access to the mental health services and substance use treatment they need to thrive.

United Way of Southern Maine Community Investments in Fiscal Year 2023

*UWSM mobilizes our community around Thrive2027, a set of three goals to ensure kids have a strong start; empower neighbors to thrive – not just survive; and help us all live longer, better. UWSM is at the heart of this work, coordinating and aligning hundreds of cross-sector organizations and individuals around Thrive2027. Your support of UWSM is an investment in ensuring the success of Thrive2027.

United Way of Southern Maine’s Community Investments in Thrive2027 Goal 1

Quality early learning experiences and healthy, safe surroundings, whether in formal or informal learning environments, prepare children to succeed in school. Reading is a crucial academic skill because it is the foundation for learning. Through third grade children are learning to read; after third grade students read to learn all of their subjects. Without a strong foundation in reading, kids are left behind at the beginning of their education and are 4 times more likely not to graduate from high school than children who read at grade level at the end of 3rd grade.

Organization Investment Amount
Adopt a School Initiative Partnering Southern Maine employers with local schools to ensure kids have a strong start and thrive $15,000
Biddeford Ready! Preparing Biddeford children to enter kindergarten prepared to thrive in school and beyond $45,000
Big Brothers Big Sisters Southern Maine Youth Mentoring Program $8,800
Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Maine Learning Recovery* $112,322
Brick and Beam Society (various investments) Science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) and literacy enrichment opportunities for children* $112,500
Caring Unlimited Parent Support Services $14,100
Catherine Morrill Day Nursery Quality Learning Program $70,009
Catholic Charities Maine St. Elizabeth’s Child Development Center $28,919
Catholic Charities Maine St. Louis Child Development Center $26,400
Count ME In Count ME In $20,120
Freeport Community Services Youth/Family Food Programs $9,031
Girl Scouts of Maine A Place for Girls $6,250
Kids First Center Helping Children Thrive: Building Resiliency in Divorce & Separation $10,050
Kids Free to Grow Parenting Programs $4,500
Kids Free to Grow School and Community Based Programs $3,000
LearningWorks After School Program $17,600
Locker Project Providing families with young children at risk of hunger with reliable access to healthy food $15,000
MaineHealth The Children’s Initiative Early Childhood Education Collaborative $90,000
Northeast Hearing and Speech Speech & Hearing Services $86,000
The Opportunity Alliance Child Development Associate Development Center $21,700
The Opportunity Alliance Early Childhood Initiative $115,140
The Opportunity Alliance Maine Families $15,000
Portland Public Schools Gerald E. Talbot Community School Academic and Social Supports $80,000
Salvation Army Sanford Emergency Assistance $3,350
Sanford Springvale YMCA Early Learning Center $5,000
Spurwink Teen Mental Health $25,000
Spurwink Therapeutic Preschool $27,000
Sweetser School Based Services $10,050
Thrive2027 ACEs Trainings Community trainings on Adverse Childhood Experiences* $55,000
Time of Wonder Childcare Center $6,250
Women United (various investments) Two-generational solutions that advance single mothers and their children* $193,000
Woodfords Family Services Woodfords’ Westbrook Early Childhood Services Program Expansion Request $20,000
YMCA of Southern Maine Full Day Childcare $14,960
York County Community Action Corp. A Place for Us $20,100
York County Community Action Corp. GATHER $6,700
York County Community Action Corp. Mental Health Support for Head Start Children

$27,000

Youth & Family Outreach Youth & Family Outreach

$50,000

Youth Full Maine Nourishing York County’s Students, Families & Communities $8,800

Investments with an * symbol are listed in the multiple goal areas that their program addresses. The amounts shown reflect the total funding to the program.

United Way of Southern Maine’s Community Investments in Thrive2027 Goal 2

As we continue to see an increase in the cost of living, many of our neighbors earning low to moderate incomes cannot afford to pay for their basic needs, build up their savings, and plan for the future of their families. That’s why UWSM mobilizes the community around Thrive2027 Goal 2 and secures resources to support education, employment opportunities, and assets that help more people achieve financial stability so they can thrive in their daily lives, reach their goals, and recover from a crisis quickly.

We use housing costs to measure our progress on Goal 2 because they are huge fixed costs for everyone. As a general rule, government and financial experts recommend that a household spend no more than 30% of their income on housing (rent or mortgage, home equity loans, real estate taxes, insurance, homeowners’ association fees, and utilities). Those paying more than 30% of their income on housing are considered “cost-burdened” and may have difficulty affording other necessities. When people have opportunities to become financially stable, they can pay their rent on time and put food on the table. They are also better able to save for emergencies, pay for their prescription medicine, buy a house, pay for college, and save for retirement.

Organization Investment Amount
A Company of Girls Creative Expanded Learning: Arts-Based Resiliency, Mentorship, and Empowerment Supports for Girls $24,018
Apex Youth Connection Connecting youth to their future paths through their communities $26,400
Avesta Housing HomeOwnership Center and Financial Stability Counseling $24,000
Avesta Housing Support for Previously Homeless Individuals/Families (Housing Support Workers) $36,100
Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Maine Learning Recovery* $112,322
Brick and Beam Society (various investments) Science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) and literacy enrichment opportunities for children* $112,500
Caring Unlimited Outreach Services $14,080
Catholic Charities Maine Immigration Legal Services $48,000
CA$H Maine Statewide collaboration working together to help empower Maine individuals and families to achieve long-term financial stability $40,200
Community Dental Low Income Oral Health Access Program “Access”, Biddeford Center $17,600
Cumberland County Organizations Support for individuals and families temporarily housed in hotels due to COVID-19 protocols and the lack of shelter and housing space $2,855,843
Fair Tide Housing and Case Management $8,800
Goodwill Industries of Northern New England Job Connection Southern Maine $55,800
Greater Portland Family Promise Homelessness Prevention and Housing Stabilization $10,000
Greater Portland Workforce Initiative Workforce pipeline that addresses roadblocks to entry into employment sectors and the unique barriers of targeted job seekers $249,600
Greater Portland Workforce Initiative Child Care Business Lab $95,000
Immigrant Legal Advocacy Project Immigration Legal Services $40,115
Immigrant Legal Advocacy Project and Maine Association for New Americans Support for local refugees arriving from Afghanistan $25,000
LearningWorks Service Works $5,525
LearningWorks YouthBuild 2023 $7,621
Legal Services for the Elderly Cumberland County Senior Legal Helpline $12,500
Legal Services for the Elderly Elder Abuse Law Project $16,046
Legal Services for the Elderly York County Senior Legal Helpline $8,800
Morrison Center Integrated Therapy $5,000
The Opportunity Alliance Foster Grandparent Program $5,360
The Opportunity Alliance Gateway to Opportunity Initiative with the Maine Youth Action Network $29,500
The Opportunity Alliance Senior Companion Program $20,100
Pine Tree Legal Assistance Homelessness Prevention and Family Stability $8,800
Planned Parenthood NNE York County Reproductive Health $8,800
Portland ConnectED – Starting Strong Portland Works for Kids: Child care access for workforce participation $22,000
Portland Housing Authority Empowerme $70,000
Portland Public Schools / Portland Adult Education High School Credential attainment and Support for Post-Secondary Matriculation $87,651
Portland Public Schools / Portland Adult Education Street Academy $40,115
Preble Street Critical Needs Programs $232,440
Quality Housing Coalition Project HOME $24,069
Regional Transportation Program Transportation $26,242
Salvation Army OOB Hands Up $5,000
Sanford Springvale YMCA Community Little Pantry $3,000
Sanford Springvale YMCA Trafton Center $4,400
SARSSM  York County Sexual Assault Response Team $26,400
Seeds of Hope Neighborhood Center Welcome Home $8,800
Statewide Homeless Response System Service Hub coordination for Cumberland County and Midcoast Maine $160,000
Thrive2027 ACEs Trainings Community trainings on Adverse Childhood Experiences* $55,000
Through These Doors Emergency Shelter for Victims of Abuse in Cumberland County $26,632
Vet to Vet Maine Vet to Vet Maine Peer Companion Program York County $13,000
Women United (various investments) Two-generational solutions that advance single mothers and their children* $193,000
York County Community Action Corp. Hope Fund $6,700
York County Community Action Corp. York County Transport $8,800
York Hospital  Home Meal Delivery Service for Seniors $8,800
York Hospital  Prescription Assistance $6,700

Investments with an * symbol are listed in the multiple goal areas that their program addresses. The amounts shown reflect the total funding to the program.

United Way of Southern Maine’s Community Investments in Thrive2027 Goal 3

Headlines continue to highlight a troubling reality: people are dying too young. Tragically, this trend is driven by deaths from drug overdose and suicide. The sobering statistics send an urgent message that we are losing too many neighbors, too early, to preventable conditions¹. Bottom line: we must all work together to reverse this trend and help ensure that all people in Southern Maine live longer – better.

¹When someone under the age of 75 dies, their death is considered premature (U.S. CDC). Each premature death adds to Years of Potential Life Lost (YPLL) by counting the number of years before 75. The YPLL is a rate per 100,000 people and is adjusted for key statistical factors. The rate emphasizes deaths of younger people. Most people who die from preventable deaths are younger than those who die by chronic diseases such as heart disease or cancer. (MaineHealth, 2018 Health Index Report)

Organization Investment Amount
211 Maine Free, confidential information and referral service that connects people of all ages across Maine to local services $195,000
Amistad, Inc. Peer Outreach Worker Program $55,000
The Center for Grieving Children Bereavement Support $57,600
Day One Adolescent and Family Community Treatment Services $64,000
Day One Adolescent Medication Management $37,399
Day One Adolescent Residential Treatment Services $27,000
Day One Street Program $96,231
Frannie Peabody Center Client Services $28,454
Frannie Peabody Center Access to Basic Needs for People Living with or at-risk of HIV/AIDS $8,800
MaineHealth Lancaster Street Outpatient Psychiatry Department $161,721
Milestone Recovery HOME Team $90,000
NAMI Maine Mental Health First Aid trainings $12,800
Pine Tree Legal Assistance Safe and Stable Families Thrive $92,515
Greater Portland Health Behavioral and Mental Health Services in Greater Portland’s School-Based Health Centers $30,000
Preble Street Health Services $35,000
Spurwink Project NOW: Ending Youth Exploitation $30,503
Thrive2027 ACEs Trainings Community trainings on Adverse Childhood Experiences* $55,000

Investments with an * symbol are listed in the multiple goal areas that their program addresses. The amounts shown reflect the total funding to the program.

United Way of Southern Maine’s Racial Equity Fund

The Racial Equity Fund supports the work of local nonprofits led by and serving people of color in our community, while advancing the work at the heart of the community developed Thrive2027 initiative. Although United Way funded programs currently serve an estimated 50% people of color, the Racial Equity Fund was established as one step to more intentionally address disparities in education, financial stability, and health. To further reduce inequities in the nonprofit sector related to funding and network access, UWSM made outreach and raising awareness of The Fund a top priority. Additionally, UWSM provided preparation and technical assistance support and retained independent grant writers who were available to assist each potential applicant.

Organization Investment Amount
Gateway Community Services Maine* Youth Mentoring Program  $30,750
In Her Presence* Moving Onto the Stage Year 2  $76,160
Intercultural Community Center* Capacity Building  $40,000
Maine Association for New Americans  MANA Community Transportation Project  $24,051

Those with an * next to their names meet the fund’s priority of supporting Black and African American led and serving organizations.